Daniela Bronzy



My name is Reilly DeVie. Friendships are often difficult to define. My friendship with the late Daniela Bronzy, for whom I am writing, was an unlikely bond. We met while purchasing art supplies at the now defunct art store, Boise Blue in downtown Boise, ID and maintained a friendship of sorts through handwritten letters and postcards and the occasional personal visit. Upon her death, after sorting through and organizing her modest assortment of belongings, several unknown and unread manuscripts and short stories along with a handful of illustrated children’s books in various stages of completion, were uncovered and read for the first time.

Writer’s bio

Ms. Bronzy, born Dee Collier, was a coal miner’s daughter growing up in Dunbar, West Virginia. At a 4th of July fireworks show along the river in London, West Virginia, she met her future husband Ernest Bronzy who took his new wife, on the same day of her 18th birthday, across the country to try life in the west where he had secured a job with Boise Cascade. That cross-country trip bonded the two for the short life they would share together and was a constant staple of conversation until Ernie’s accidental death while harvesting trees in Montana.

Ernie had bought her a piece of land and built her a house where she would spend the next 44 years widowed and alone. Up until her tragic car accident that left both her legs, as she called them ‘useless noodles’ she was a devout member of the Catholic Church and somehow maintained her faith even after all the tragedy in her life. She was visited often by the traveling Father Simon who would check in on her for ‘Homily Thursdays’ where she would cook the two of them dinner and he would practice Sunday’s homily to be given in some church in need of a traveling priest, and she would offer her words of encouragement and occasional criticism. While she rarely ventured away from her house, she found friendships in the oddest places. Sidewalks, grocery checkout lines, parades and art stores. Those same people brought her groceries, brought her art supplies or firewood, and sometimes became the occasional short-term house guest.

What her friends didn’t know, Ms. Bronzy was pursuing an interest in writing historical and religious thrillers along with poignant tales for children. During her life, she wrote three complete manuscripts whose characters interact and weave between the trio in a saga she called ‘Folklore Anthropology’, as well as also penned and illustrated several Caldecott hopeful children books in various degrees of completion.

She also reimagined the idea of what a book could be. In her modest library collection, it included several science fiction thrillers from the early 20th century writers, complete with illustrations, that introduced the world to never before seen or imagined ideas and gadgetry: driverless cars, rockets to the moon, holograms and television, lasers and submarines, helicopters and mobile phones.

In her own novels and children’s books, Ms. Bronzy make’s real her own imagined ideas. Some good, some remain undecided, creating a new classification of novel designed around the notion of introducing and selling previously imagined products. I have been named the executor of her estate and granted the task of bringing her ideas to life. Available on this site are a few that are introduced in her first released novel, ‘The Ossuary’s Paladin’ which include, The BloWish, Sunset Arches, Whistle-pig Ammo and the Ida-Hoe, all original ideas developed, introduced and made integral in the telling of her story.

In her own novels and children’s books, Ms. Bronzy make’s real her own imagined ideas. Some good, some remain undecided, creating a new classification of novel designed around the notion of introducing and selling previously imagined products. I have been named the executor of her estate and granted the task of bringing her ideas to life. Available on this site are a few that are introduced in her first released novel, ‘The Ossuary’s Paladin’ which include, The BloWish, Sunset Arches, Whistle-pig Ammo and the Ida-Hoe, all original ideas developed, introduced and made integral in the telling of her story.


I have become a real fan of her novels and only wish she were still around to discuss her characters and plots and inner torments that lead her to write such thrilling and divisive tales. Please take advantage of the free content available on the site to familiarize yourself with her writing and ideas. And stay tuned for the release of her second novel, ‘761.207’s as well as the first illustrated children’s book “Put on Your Shoes” available on this site and bookstores across the country.

Visit Her Obituary